Keyword: Teaching Artist

Creative Aging Programming: Lessons Learned

This webinar was offered to teaching artists, arts organization and senior center staff in NYC who completed a Creative Aging program and wanted to bring their programming to the next level.

During the workshop, participants:

  • Reflected upon the challenges and successes of past residencies
  • Brainstormed and identify action steps toward future successful partnerships
  • Learned about planning templates and tools for use in future programming

This free professional development opportunity is part of the New York City Creative Aging Initiative which has been made possible through the generous support of The New York Community Trust.

Writing A Great Creative Aging Proposal

This webinar was offered to NYC-based teaching artists and arts organizations interested in writing a proposal for a Creative Aging program in any arts discipline.

Attendees learned about:

  • The two main pillars of Creative Aging programs: skills mastery and social engagement
  • Strategies to connect their program plans to best practices in Creative Aging program design
  • Best practices in writing a Creative Aging program grant
  • The importance of the culminating event and how to use it as an opportunity to connect the senior center and the older adult participants to the wider community

This free professional development opportunity is part of the New York City Creative Aging Initiative which has been made possible through the generous support of The New York Community Trust.

Preparing for a Creative Aging Program

This webinar was offered to teaching artists, arts organization and senior center staff in NYC  who delivered Creative Aging programming and were applicable to SU-CASA residencies. This webinar also served as a way to connect attendees with other Creative Aging program stakeholders in NYC.

Attendees learned about:

  • The importance of partnerships in the planning process
  • The specific roles and responsibilities that contribute to successful program implementation
  • Proven marketing and recruiting techniques

This free professional development opportunity is part of the New York City Creative Aging Initiative which has been made possible through the generous support of The New York Community Trust.

Designing Flexible Arts Programming in a Senior Center Setting

This webinar was offered to teaching artists and arts organization staff in NYC who delivered a Creative Aging program in any arts discipline in a senior center setting, and were applicable to SU-CASA residencies.

Attendees learned about:

  • Program models appropriate for senior centers
  • Capacity of senior centers to support Creative Aging programming
  • Ways to adapt their programs to match the organizational capacity of the senior center and the interests of the participants

The moderators, Annie Montgomery and Abigail Jefferson, interviewed Lifetime Arts Creative Aging Roster Artist, Spica Wobbe, about her experience teaching in the SU-CASA program and how she adapted her plans to suit the needs of both the center and the participants.

This free professional development opportunity is part of the New York City Creative Aging Initiative which has been made possible through the generous support of The New York Community Trust.

Annie Montgomery, Teaching Artist

In this interview with Lifetime Arts’ Director of Education, Annie Montgomery, she talks about how her passion for theatre inspired her to become a teaching artist, and how a colleague invited her to co-teach one of Lifetime Arts first pilot program at the New York Public Library. This work opened up opportunities for her to do more work in storytelling, memoir and performance in a more organized capacity. Annie shares her experiences working in this field and with older adult learners.

Paul Ferrara, Teaching Artist

in this interview with visual and performing artist Paul Ferrara, he talks about how he began teaching art on a volunteer basis at a senior center in my neighborhood. He was inspired when he attended an art exhibit from a series of classes taught by teaching artists from Elders Share the Arts, where Dr. Gene Cohen was a featured speaker. At the event, he was encouraged to teach an art class at a branch library in Washington Heights. From there, he became involved with Lifetime Arts. Paul shares his experience along with the joys of teaching older adults.

Tamara Keshecki, Teaching Artist

In this interview with classical flute player, Tamara Keshecki, she talks about how she began working as a teaching artist in elementary and intermediate schools, with developmentally disabled adults and through a non-profit arts organization, Musical Chairs Chamber Ensemble, Inc. This led her to teaching Creative Aging programs through Lifetime Arts. Through Musical Chairs Chamber Ensemble, Inc., she has taught almost 100 Creative Aging classes of the Roaring Chorus. Tamara also talks about her experience in this work and serving older adults.

Bill Wertheim, Teaching Artist

In this interview with poet and artist, Bill Wertheim, he talks about how he got started as a teaching artist, and how he later met Ed Friedman and Maura O’Malley at the Town of Pelham Public Library while teaching poetry/memoir classes. He connected with the work at Lifetime Arts and his career in the Creative Aging took off. Bill shares his experiences with working with older adults, the most satisfying parts of this work, and more.

Joan Green, Teaching Artist

In this interview with dancer Joan Green, she talks about how she began teaching dance to  young children. She later became fascinated by the work of choreographer Liz Lerman when she first began teaching dance to elders and included older dancers in her choreography. Joan took a workshop with her and was inspired to create a diverse inter-generational, inter-racial group ​of 15 women from age 12 to age 68 (including 5 professional dancers) for a three month dance and oral history workshop series. Joan shares how this work has helped her to make a difference.

Mary Crescenzo, Teaching Artist

In this interview with literary teaching artist, Mary Crescenzo, she talks about her first experience with teaching older adult learners, and how this experience led her to instruct adult education courses in theater, visual, and literary arts at various colleges in New York, Tulsa, and Santa Fe. This also led to her creation of an arts and Alzheimer’s program using watercolor, music and movement, called “An ABC Approach to Alzheimer’s Awareness and Care Through the Arts.”